Taking Care Of Business At The Driver's License Office


When you get your driver's license, you have to go to your local Department of Motor Vehicles, or DMV. Typically, at the driver's license office, you will spend anywhere from one to three hours. Many DMVs have speeded up this process with increased numbers of employees to process applications. You will need to bring with you some form of identification and proof of a permanent address, usually something like a bill from a utility company or a rental agreement for an apartment. Once you have signed in and established a place in the queue, you can sit down and fill out any necessary forms.

If this is your first time at the driver's license office, and you have never had a driver's license before, you will have to take two tests. The first is a written test, usually administered by computer. This will consist of questions pertaining to the laws which govern all drivers, regardless of their type vehicle. There are, of course, different regulations that govern certain types of vehicles, such as buses or large semi tractor-trailers, or even motorcycles, and there are tests that are geared to these more specialized types of vehicles. Most of us, however, go to the DMV to get a regular old driver's license.

Now that you have passed your written examination, you will have to take the next - and probably most dreaded - test that is required at the driver's license office: the actual driving test. You will have to schedule this, as there are fewer driving examiners than clerical staff available. Be sure to arrive a little early for your driving test. Do not, under any circumstances, partake of any sort of alcohol prior to this test! Listen carefully to the driving examiner and obey all of his (or her) directions to the letter. Every error you make will count against you in your driving test, so be careful. You will most likely be required to demonstrate such things as parallel parking, how well you turn corners, if you obey all traffic laws, such as the speed limit, and more.

Having successfully completed the driving test, you will then have to go back into the driver's license office and complete the paperwork for your actual license. You will have to pass a vision screening, to determine whether or not you must wear corrective lenses (i.e., glasses or contacts) in order to drive, and you must provide proof of insurance. Finally, having passed the written and the driving examinations, you will then be ushered down the line to the photo station, where you will be directed to stand on a certain mark, and smile for the camera. You will be asked if you wish to be an organ donor, in many states, and you will sign the license form. In just a few minutes, your license will be ready.

 

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